The Trinity

By Marie D. Jones and Larry Flaxman

Reviewed by Christopher Zoukis

Concerning three, Aristotle wrote, “Three is the first number to which the word ‘all’ has been appropriated.” 

The power of three is ubiquitous.  Famous threes include body, soul, and spirit.  Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  Maiden, Mother,  and Crone.  Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva.  Folklore relates three wishes, three rites, three princes or princesses, three weird sisters, and three cheers, along with many, many others.  In other words, three is a very significant symbol.   

This significance is discussed by authors Marie Jones and Larry Flaxman in their new book, The Trinity.  And according to Jones and Flaxman, the power of three is not simply symbolical.  It is real.  Not only is the power of three real, but it can be appropriated by you or me through what we call prayer.  Through prayer, you and I can ask God or the Prime Mover or Atum or the Supreme Mind or whatever you want to call him for tangible or intangible stuff.  And we will receive it (the stuff).

As improbable as it sounds, there is nothing new about this particular use of prayer.  It’s been around for thousands of years.  In today’s world, theologians call it ‘prosperity theology.’  That is, that God or whatever you choose to call him wants you to be prosperous – in body, soul, and spirit – and all you have to do is ask.

Rhonda Byrne wrote a bestseller called The Secret a few years ago.  Prior to that, a book entitled the Prayer of Jabez made the bestseller lists.  Both books, along with many others, provided readers with insight into ‘the secret’ of prayer, the way to use prayer to obtain blessings, whether those blessings were money, a new car, a better job or simply inner happiness. 

The authors of The Trinity have taken that same basic concept and expanded upon it, making it ‘scientific’ rather than religious.  Of course, one person’s science is another person’s religion and vice versa.  According to the authors, “the concept behind the Trinity Secret” is “a code of creation.”  Appropriating this code of creation involves five steps:  recognition, identification, declaration, thanksgiving, and release.  Each step is explained in very plain language. 

More importantly, the authors point out why most prayer remains unanswered:  “The reason why most people’s prayers don’t come to pass is that once the word amen is spoken, any fear or doubt or resistance to that which has been prayed for shuts down the process!”  In other words, the supplicant’s expectations impact the outcome of the prayer, which, when you stop and think about it, means that each of us is our own little divinity.  We are all gods or goddesses.  We just need to realize it, believe it, and go from there.

Admittedly, it all sounds pretty New Age-y.  Kind of like channeling and all that other occult stuff.  On the other hand, though, there is a lot of food for thought here.  Because didn’t Jesus say, “Therefore I say unto you, what things so ever you desire, when you pray, believe that you receive them, and you shall have them.”  Yes, he did.  Well, then, is the secret discussed in The Trinity what Jesus was talking about?  I don’t know.

What I do know is this.  Despite the trendy New Age consciousness references, and the redolence of pantheism, The Trinity has much to recommend it.  For it makes a cogent argument; and it offers a new and thoughtful method for approaching prayer.  It’s one of those books that you have to read and think about.  And after thinking about it, you might decide to give it try and see if it works. 

In the end, whether it works or not, The Trinity makes for fascinating reading.  I recommend it wholeheartedly.